Engagement Practice _ 16: Delegate Tasks to Challenge Employees and Enrich

К оглавлению
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 
34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 
51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 
68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 
85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 
102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 
119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 
136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 
153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 
170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 
187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197 198 199 200 201 202 203 
204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 

Their Jobs

Today’s younger generations of workers don’t have the patience to ‘‘pay

their dues’’ as their parents had done. You may disparage their impatience,

but when they leave your company and move on to another one that may

be willing to give them the keys to the car as soon as they come in the

door, you are left high and dry without their talents. No matter how many

dues you paid as you climbed the ladder, no matter how gradually and

consistently you prepared yourself for a more meaningful role, and how

deliberately you acquired valuable knowledge, that traditional model of

gradually taking on incremental challenges is considered outdated by many

Gen-Xers and Millennials. Most younger workers have a more short-term

focus. They want meaningful work roles NOW.

This means you will need to employ the job enrichment guidelines

above and, in many cases, start delegating tasks that you may have been

uncomfortable delegating in the past.

Here are some reasons you may be reluctant to delegate:

You’re afraid they will screw things up.

There’s no time to train them to the point where you can trust them

not to screw up.

You believe they need to pay their dues first, as you did.

You have some grunt work that needs doing.

You like doing the work yourself too much to let it go.

You’re afraid that empowering your workers means giving up your

power.

If you can identify with any of these concerns, you will need to work

to overcome them. For practical guidelines on how to do that, refer to ‘‘23

Steps to Better Delegation and Empowerment’’ in Keeping the People Who

Keep You in Business.15