The Employee’s Role in the Matching Process

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As in all the seven reasons employees leave, it’s not just the manager that

has all the responsibility. All employees need to be reminded that there is

much they can do to achieve the best match of their own talents to the job:

Ask questions during the interview to make sure the job is one that

will make good use of your talents.

Know your values well enough to resist being recruited into a work

culture that would not be a good fit.

If talent assessment workshops or inventories are not offered at the

organization, seek assistance with identifying your talents through a

private career coach, psychologist, community college, or university

career center.

If you feel the manager is not making good use of your talents, take

the initiative to meet with the manager to discuss how you would

like the job to be changed.

Put yourself in the manager’s shoes and be prepared to explain how

enriching their own job will also benefit the work unit or organization

as a whole.

Seek whatever training you need to earn the trust of the manager to

delegate more to them.

Instead of getting too comfortable when you have mastered a job,

keep yourself engaged by seeking new challenges.

Ask for feedback when you feel you are not getting enough of it.

Employer-of-Choice Engagement Practices Review

and Checklist

Review the engagement practices presented in this chapter and check the

ones you believe your organization needs to implement or improve.

To Select the Right Talent for the Job:

9. _ Make a strong commitment to the continuous upgrading of talent.

10. _ Make sure that all hiring managers follow a consistent and thorough

talent forecasting and success-factor analysis process.

11. _ Cast a wide recruiting net to expand the universe of best-fit candidates.

12. _ Follow a purposeful and rigorous interview process.

13. _ Track measures of hiring success.

To Assign the Right Task to the Right Person:

14. _ Conduct ‘‘entrance interviews’’ with all new hires.

15. _ Work to enrich the jobs of all employees.

16. _ Delegate tasks to challenge employees and enrich their jobs.

Notes

1. Marcus Buckingham and Donald O. Clifton, Now, Discover Your

Strengths (New York: The Free Press, 2001).

2. Larry Bossidy and Ram Charan, Execution: The Discipline of Getting

Things Done (New York: Random House, 2002).

3. Edward L. Gubman, The Talent Solution: Aligning Strategy and People to

Achieve Extraordinary Results (New York: McGraw-Hill, 1998).

4. Jim Collins, author of Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the

Leap and Others Don’t (New York: Harper Business, 2001), based on

study of how eleven companies out of 1,435 went from good to great

financial performance. Web-exclusive interview in Fast Company, October

2001.

5. Nana Rausch, ‘‘War for Talent II: Several Ways to Win,’’ Peoplepalooza

column, Fast Company, June 2000.

6. Bob Calandra, ‘‘Finders Keepers,’’ Human Resource Executive, June 2,

2000.

7. ‘‘We Try to Minimize Face-to-Face Interviews,’’ Business Week, November

22, 1999.

8. Marcus Buckingham and Curt Coffman, First, Break All the Rules:

What the World’s Great Managers Do Differently (New York: Simon &

Schuster, 1999).

9. M. Mitchell Waldrop, ‘‘Dee Hock on Management,’’ Fast Company,

October/November 1996.

10. Jodi Spiegel Arthur, ‘‘Talent Scout,’’ Human Resource Executive, June 2,

2000.

11. Charles Fishman, ‘‘Whole Foods Is All Teams,’’ Fast Company, April

1996.

12. Quality Now, Staffing.org Metrics Update e-newsletter, January 8, 2003.

13. Richard Hackman and Greg R. Oldham, Work Redesign (Reading,

Mass.: Addison-Wesley, 1980).

14. Edward E. Lawler III, Treat People Right! How Organizations and Individuals

Can Propel Each Other into a Virtual Spiral of Success (San Francisco:

Jossey-Bass, 2003).

15. Leigh Branham, ‘‘Guidelines for Better Delegation and Empowerment’’

(Retention Practice _ 18: Give Autonomy and Reward Initiative),

in Leigh Branham, Keeping the People Who Keep You in Business:

24 Ways to Hang On to Your Most Valuable Talent (New York: AMACOM,

2001).