Offer Career Coaching Tools and Training for All Managers

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Recognizing that the employee’s direct supervisor is the primary agent

for achieving employee commitment and satisfaction, more companies are

providing tools and training to managers so they will be better equipped to

fulfill their career coaching responsibilities.

Many companies now provide company-sponsored training with other

managers on how to conduct career conversations, respond to frequently

asked employee career questions, complete individual development plans,

and follow through with sponsoring activity or accountability initiatives.-

How to Create a Job and Revitalize a Career

Bob Taylor had been with Charles Schwab & Company for twelve

years, but was considering leaving the company. He had begun to

lose interest in his work, but before resigning, decided to talk things

over with his boss. With his boss’ go-ahead, Taylor proposed the

creation of a job that would combine his technology and business

skills—organizational troubleshooter. ‘‘The key to my staying was to

innovate my own job,’’ said Taylor, whose formal title became vice

president of the mobile trading project at Schwab’s Electronic Brokerage

Group. ‘‘To energize someone,’’ advised Taylor, ‘‘let them

work on what they absolutely love.’’6

Some companies provide individual development planning forms and feedback

tools, such as voluntary manager skill evaluations that employees

complete to give managers feedback on their employee coaching and development

skills.

To help managers better understand the process that they will be recommending

to employees, progressive companies also invite all managers

to complete the employee self-assessment and career self-management

process for themselves. After all, they are employees, too, and they will be

more likely to encourage their employees to complete a process if they

have benefited from it themselves.